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Social Studies (E, WH, USGC, WG, USH)

American Government and Law - Course #6120 | Credit (E) | Grade 11, 12 | 0.5/1.0 Credits
This course will provide students with a general understanding of the governmental, political, and legal systems of the United States. Topics of study include the Constitution, political parties, voting, and national, state, and local government structure and function.

American Problems (Current Issues) - Course #6121 | Credit (E) | Grade 10-12 | 0.5/1.0 Credits
This course studies the problems confronting the United States. Special emphasis is on Constitutional rights and responsibilities, structures of government, and contemporary issues.

American West - Course #6123 | Credit (E) | Grade 10-12 | 0.5 Credits
This course covers the growth and development of the American West. Emphasis is on the cattle barons, Oregon Trail, California gold rush, pioneers, various Indian wars, and resettlement.

American Women's History - Course #6119 | Credit (E) | Grade 11, 12 | 0.5 Credits
This course focuses on the contribution of women in American society. The course covers women's history from colonial times to the present. Special emphasis is placed on biography, individual research and special projects.

Art History AP - Course #6115 | Credit (E) | Grade 11, 12 | 1.0 Credits
This is a year-long course that teaches the history and appreciation of great art works from the Western art traditions. It starts with prehistoric works and ends with postmodern works. University credit can be earned with a successful performance on the Advanced Placement (AP) exam.

Asian History - Course #6109 | Credit (WH) | Grade 10-12 | 0.5/1.0 Credits
This course emphasizes the increasing interrelationships of the world’s peoples through the cultural traditions and transformations of Asian history from its origins to the present. Examine historical events, political and philosophical developments, religions and social innovations, and scientific, artistic, and technological contributions from East Asia, South Asia, Southeast Asia, Central Asia, former Soviet Bloc countries, and the Middle East--connecting how Asia interacts with other world civilizations. This class counts as your required World History credit necessary to graduate.

Asian Studies - Course #6105 | Credit (E) | Grade 10-12 | 0.5 Credits
This course will introduce and generate a broad interest in Asia and its diverse cultural heritage through multiple perspectives. Students will explore the rich cultural heritage of Asia (ranging from but not limited to China, India, and Japan) by looking at the cultural exchange within and beyond Asia over a history of two thousand years. Topics include early intellectual traditions, religion, arts, language, literature, science, communication and everyday life.

Comparative World Religions - Course #6118 | Credit (E) | Grade 11, 12 | 0.5 Credits
This course is an introduction to the historical and philosophical foundations of the major religions of the world. Religions to be studied include Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Islam, Christianity and various Chinese religions.

Economics: Macro AP - Course #6153 | Credit (E) | Grade 11, 12 | 1.0 Credits
Prerequisite: Instructor approval
This course introduces students to fundamental economic concepts such as scarcity and opportunity costs. Other basic concepts include functions of an economic system and use of the tools of supply and demand to analyze a market economy. University credit can be earned with a successful performance on the Advanced Placement (AP) exam.

Economics: Micro AP - Course #6154 | Credit (E) | Grade 11, 12 | 1.0 Credits
Prerequisite: Instructor approval
This course gives students a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to both consumers and producers within the larger economic system. It emphasizes the nature and functions of product markets, the study of factor markets, and the government’s role in promoting efficiency and equity in the economy. University credit can be earned with a successful performance on the Advanced Placement (AP) exam.

European History AP - Course #6103 | Credit (WH) | Grade 10-12 | 1.0 Credits
Prerequisite: Instructor approval
This college-level course in European history is intended for the above average history student. Emphasis is placed on advanced study, research, and analytical skills. The course covers European history from 1450 C.E. to the present and focuses on intellectual-cultural, political-diplomatic, and social-economic history. University credit can be earned with a successful performance on the Advanced Placement (AP) exam. This course fulfills the core requirement for graduation.

Government and Politics: American AP - Course #6124 | Credit (USGC) | Grade 11, 12 | 0.5/1.0 Credits
Prerequisite: Instructor approval
This college level course covers Constitutional underpinnings of United States government; political beliefs and behaviors; political parties, interest groups and mass media; institutions of national government; the Congress, the presidency, the bureaucracy, and the federal courts; public policy; and civil rights and civil liberties. University credit can be earned with a successful performance on the Advanced Placement (AP) exam.

Government and Politics: Comparative AP - Course #6125 | Credit (E) | Grade 11, 12 | 0.5 Credits
Prerequisite: Instructor approval
This college-level course is an introduction to comparative politics: the sources of public authority and political power; society and politics; citizen and state; political framework; and political change. Five countries form the core of this course: France, Great Britain, China, Russia/the former Soviet Union, and one of the following: India, Mexico, or Nigeria. University credit can be earned with a successful performance on the Advanced Placement (AP) exam

The Historian’s Craft - Course #6108 | Credit (E) | Grade 10-12 | 0.5 Credits
This course allows students to study select class-selected topics of interest at an in-depth level by drawing upon modern-day media (film, music, literature, and graphic novels) and traditional historical sources (primary works, research, reading, simulation and direct instruction) to analyze the similarities and differences between actual events and popular media portrayals. As a result of this in-depth study and comparison, students will investigate why we choose to represent and portray the past in different ways in modern-day media.

The History of Sports in the United States - Course #6152 | Credit (E) | Grade 11, 12 | 0.5 Credits
This course concentrates largely on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and explores games and play during the revolutionary period as an antecedent to organized sports. In addition to examining the history of different sports, particularly those thought of as “national” sports. The course will also explore the rise of the athlete as a popular cultural hero, issues of gender and race in the sporting world, and the extent to which debates within the U.S. sporting world have changed over time.

Human Geography AP - Course #6126 | Credit (WG) | Grade 10-12 | 1.0 Credits
Prerequisite: Instructor approval
This college-level course covers the nature and perspectives of geography, population, cultural patterns and processes, political organization of space, agricultural and rural land use, industrialization and economic development, and cities and urban land use. University credit can be earned with a successful performance on the Advanced Placement (AP) exam.

International Relations (Model U.N.) - Course #6130 | Credit (E) | Grade 10-12 | 0.5/1.0 Credits
Prerequisite: Instructor approval
This course covers the United Nations' history, organization, and current activities. The course program includes a study of foreign policy and world politics, and opportunities to participate in the United Nations conference simulations.

Introduction to Philosophy - Course #6142 | Credit (E) | Grade 11, 12 | 0.5/1.0 Credits
This class is an introduction to the field of philosophy. The course includes an overview of several different philosophers, philosophical systems, subsections of philosophy, and methods of thinking.

Middle Eastern Studies - Course #6104 | Credit (E) | Grade 10-12 | 0.5 Credits
This course will consist of a study in the development of ancient civilizations through the current Middle Eastern region, including the foundation of monotheistic religions; first civilizations; Muslim empires; regional trade; social, political, and cultural continuity and change; religious division and regional relations; interaction with Western ideologies; and current events that include politics, violence, terrorism, and the world’s response.

Psychology 1 - Course #6133 | Credit (E) | Grade 10-12 | 0.5/1.0 Credits
This course covers human behavior including the development of personality, sensation, perception, learning, and language. It also includes experiments and classroom participation. Advanced work emphasizes emotions, mental disorders and their treatment, personality theories, therapies, and testing.

Psychology 2 - Course #6134 | Credit (E) | Grade 10-12 | 0.5/1.0 Credits
Prerequisite: Psychology 1 and/or Instructor approval
The course provides an in-depth study of topics covered in Psychology I. The course also emphasizes the application of psychological principles through experimentation and observation.

Psychology AP - Course #6135 | Credit (E) | Grade 10-12 | 1.0 Credits
Prerequisite: Instructor approval
This college-level course covers the history of psychology, research methods, biological bases of behavior, sensation/perception, states of consciousness, learning, cognition, motivation, developmental psychology, personality, testing, abnormal psychology, treatment of psychological disorders, and social psychology. University credit can be earned with a successful performance on the Advanced Placement (AP) exam.

Sociology 1 - Course #6140 | Credit (E) | Grade 10-12 | 0.5/1.0 Credits
This course is the systematic study of human society. Topics to be covered include basic theories of interpersonal and group interaction, culture, socialization, groups and their effect on the individual, deviance and crime, race and ethnicity, religion, social class, the family, gender roles and the environment.

Sociology 2 - Course #6141 | Credit (E) | Grade 10-12 | 0.5 Credits
Prerequisite: Sociology 1 and/or Instructor approval
This course continues and expands upon topics covered in Sociology I. The course also emphasizes individual experimentation and observation.

Sports Psychology - Course #6136 | Credit (E) | Grade 10-12 | 0.5 Credits
This course is for competitive athletes or performers. Students will explore the field of Sports Psychology and will learn techniques to help them mentally prepare for performance situations. Topics to be covered include teamwork, communication, focus, confidence, imagery, attitude, goal setting, self-talk, winning, handling fear, and resilience.

U.S. Government and Citizenship - Course #6128 | Credit (USGC) | Grade 11, 12 | 0.5 Credits
The goal of this course is to foster informed, responsible participation in public life. Knowing how to be a good citizen is essential to the preservation and improvement of the United States. Upon completion of this course the student will understand the major ideas, protections, rights, structures, and economic systems that affect the life of a citizen in the United States. Additionally, students will practice the skills needed to conduct inquiries, weigh evidence, make informed decisions, and participate in political processes. This course should nurture desirable dispositions including a commitment to the American ideals of liberty, equality, opportunity, and justice for all. This course is recommended for seniors due to their proximity to voting age.

United States History 2 - Course #6111 | Credit (USH) | Grade 10-12 | 1.0 Credits
United States History 2 addresses the making of modern America, highlighting the events and issues in United States history from the late Industrial Revolution to modern times. Topics include, but are not limited to, the Industrial Revolution, the Progressive movement, imperialism and foreign affairs, the World Wars, the Great Depression, the Cold War, the civil rights movements, the rise of terrorism, and modern social and political history.The standards can be taught either chronologically or thematically, but are organized into chronological periods. Periodization is an organizational tool historians use to make connections and draw distinctions. Periods are flexible ways of making meaning, and sometimes overlap chronologically. Effort should be made to help students make connections between the events and ideas of the past and their lives today. Contextualizing the study of modern America by helping students make connections across the span of U.S. history can enrich and deepen their understanding of their own place in the American story.

U.S. History AP - Course #6113 | Credit (USH) | Grade 10-12 | 1.0 Credits
Prerequisite: Instructor approval
This course is a college-level course in American history from the period of the first European explorations of the Americas to the present. The course emphasizes political institutions and behavior, public policy, social and economic change, diplomacy and human relations, and cultural and intellectual developments. University credit can be earned with a successful performance on the Advanced Placement (AP) exam.

United States History 2 H - Course #6112 | Credit (USH) | Grade 10-12 | 1.0 Credits
Prerequisite: Instructor approval
United States History 2 H addresses the making of modern America, highlighting the events and issues in United States history from the late Industrial Revolution to modern times. Topics include, but are not limited to, the Industrial Revolution, the Progressive movement, imperialism and foreign affairs, the World Wars, the Great Depression, the Cold War, the civil rights movements, the rise of terrorism, and modern social and political history.The standards can be taught either chronologically or thematically, but are organized into chronological periods. Periodization is an organizational tool historians use to make connections and draw distinctions. Periods are flexible ways of making meaning, and sometimes overlap chronologically. Effort should be made to help students make connections between the events and ideas of the past and their lives today. Contextualizing the study of modern America by helping students make connections across the span of U.S. history can enrich and deepen their understanding of their own place in the American story.

U.S. Ethnic Studies - Course #6107 | Credit (E) | Grade 12 | 0.5 Credits
U.S. Ethnic Studies is a social justice class that takes a conceptual study of identity, race, diversity and intolerance in the United States. It will study the achievements and struggles of different ethnic and religious groups in the United States like African Americans, Native Americans, Latinos, Asian Americans, Polynesian Americans, Jews, Catholics, Muslims, and Mormons. By taking the course, students should be able to reflect on themselves as individuals and as members of a community through understanding different types of oppression, counter histories, and theories of social justice that will empower them to take action to improve themselves and society as a whole.

World History - Course #6101 | Credit (WH) | Grade 10-12 | 1.0 Credits
World History addresses events and issues in world history from the earliest evidence of human existence to modern times. Whenever possible, students will be expected to make connections between historically significant events and current issues. These connections are intended to add personal relevance and deepen students’ understanding of the world today. Topics include, but are not limited to, the Neolithic Revolution, the dawn of civilization, the development of world religions, patterns in world trade, contributions of classical civilizations, the diffusion of technology, colonization and imperialism, global conflict, modern revolutions and independence movements, and current trends in globalization. The standards can be taught chronologically, thematically, or regionally, but are organized into chronological periods. Periodization is an organizational tool historians use to make connections and draw distinctions. Periods are flexible ways of making meaning, and may overlap chronologically.

World History H - Course #6102 | Credit (WH) | Grade 10-12 | 1.0 Credits
Prerequisite: Instructor approval
World History addresses events and issues in world history from the earliest evidence of human existence to modern times. Whenever possible, students will be expected to make connections between historically significant events and current issues. These connections are intended to add personal relevance and deepen students’ understanding of the world today. Topics include, but are not limited to, the Neolithic Revolution, the dawn of civilization, the development of world religions, patterns in world trade, contributions of classical civilizations, the diffusion of technology, colonization and imperialism, global conflict, modern revolutions and independence movements, and current trends in globalization. The standards can be taught chronologically, thematically, or regionally, but are organized into chronological periods. Periodization is an organizational tool historians use to make connections and draw distinctions. Periods are flexible ways of making meaning, and may overlap chronologically.

World History AP - Course #6114 | Credit (WH) | Grade 10-12 | 1.0 Credits
Prerequisite: Instructor approval
This college-level course helps students develop a greater understanding of the evolution of global processes and contacts, in interaction with different types of human societies. Emphasis is placed in advanced study, research and analytical skills. The course covers the period from approximately 1000 C.E. to the present and focuses on Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the religion and culture of Islam. University credit can be earned with a successful performance on the Advanced Placement (AP) exam. This course fulfills the core requirement for graduation.

World War II - Course #6106 | Credit (E) | Grade 11, 12 | 0.5 Credits
This course will be a semester long course covering the causes, course, and results of World War II. The Holocaust, as well as aggression in Europe and Asia/Pacific will also be discussed. In addition, the long term effects of the war on the soldier, civilians, the home front, the economy and society will be explored.


LEGEND (Credit)

A = Fine Arts
AAF-M = Applied, Advanced Foundation Math
AAF-S = Applied, Advanced Foundation Science
BS = Biological Science
CS = Chemistry Science
DS = Digital Studies
CTE = Career and Technical Education
E = Electives
ES = Earth Science
F = Financial Literacy
WG = World Geography
HE = Health Education

ILA = Individual Lifetime Activities
ELA = English Language Arts
FL = Fitness for Life
M = Mathematics
PS = Physical Science
PST = Participation Skills & Techniques
Sr. ELA= Senior English Language Arts
S = Foundation/Core Science
WH = World History
USH = US History
USGC = US Government & Citizenship

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